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Survey: Tell Us How You REALLY Feel About Guy Fieri

Survey: Tell Us How You REALLY Feel About Guy Fieri


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The pop culture phenomenon is one of the most polarizing people in food

Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images for Caesars Entertainment

Fieri is best known for his hair, shades, bling, and allusions to Flavortown.

Guy Fieri is easily one of the most polarizing figures in the food world today. He’s the host of Food Network’s insanely popular Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives, he runs several extremely successful restaurants, and he’s even got his own wine business. But for many of the same reasons why people love him – his exuberance, his Cali bro shtick, his glorification of thousand-calorie dishes – lots of people also wish he would just disappear. How do you feel about him?

With his laid-back vibe, spiky blond hair, and roster of catchphrases (many of which involve the fictional utopia of Flavortown), Fieri has latched onto a zeitgeist and hasn’t let go. On DDD, he travels across the country showcasing the hardworking small-town chefs who are turning out delicious creations at unheralded restaurants (something he rightfully should be commended for), but his own restaurants, which are essentially just showcases of Fieri’s cult of personality, couldn’t be further from the restaurants he showcases on television. And he’s become a franchise in his own right on Food Network; there’s rarely a night where DDD isn’t airing.

But how to you feel about the guy? Do you love him, binge-watch “Triple-D”, and eat at his restaurant whenever you’re in New York, or do you wish he would just go away already? Take the survey below and let us know!


Guy Fieri’s Spicy Chili Recipe Packs a Serious Punch

Regardless of whether or not you want to visit Flavortown, just about everyone knows who Guy Fieri is. But what you might not know is that beyond the frosted tips and bowling shirts, Fieri is a pretty serious cook, too. Along with showing the nation some of the best under-the-radar restaurants on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, Fieri has authored multiple best-selling cookbooks, owned restaurants, and cooked alongside some of the best chefs in the business. In short? His fiery persona is not just for show.

So when hunting for a chili recipe that wouldn’t hold back, I knew Fieri would deliver. I figured his all-or-nothing approach to cooking would be perfect for chili, and who better to amp up the spice than the mayor of Flavortown himself? His recipe — dubbed dragon’s breath chili — uses a slew of zesty ingredients from roasted peppers to spicy Italian sausage, so I knew it would pack a punch.

How to Make Guy Fieri’s “Dragon’s Breath Chili”

Guy starts by cooking diced Anaheim and poblano chilis along with jalapeños, bell peppers, and onions until caramelized. To that, he adds garlic and cubes of chuck roast.

Once browned, Guy adds even more meat (ground beef and bulk Italian sausage) and a slew of spices — including chili powder, cayenne, coriander, and cumin — and cooks them until fragrant. Then he adds tomato sauce, tomato paste, beer, stock, and two types of beans (whew) and lets everything simmer for two hours.

Here’s where the true Fieri-ness kicks in. While the chili is simmering, Fieri makes a batch of homemade french fries to serve with the chili. (Because really, what better garnish is there?) His process is pretty typical and involves soaking the potatoes, par-cooking them, and finishing them in hot oil. He serves the chili with the fries and garnishes everything with crackers, green onions, and shredded cheese.

What I Thought of the Results

When Guy named his chili “dragon’s breath,” he wasn’t kidding. This chili is seriously hot and not for the faint of heart. The heat creeps up on you as you eat, and slowly hits you in the back of the throat. Between the jalapeños and the cayenne, this chili is very spicy.

But it’s not heat without flavor — and Guy’s chili is actually very tasty. It has a generous amount of seasoning and doesn’t skimp on flavor. While other chili recipes are pretty mild (I’m looking at you, Ina), Guy’s is the complete opposite. It’s intense, fiery, and doesn’t hold back — just like Fieri himself. The generous amount of garlic, onions, and roasted peppers adds a depth of flavor that makes it taste almost like a mole sauce, and the complexity made me want to keep eating.

So if you love spicy foods, this chili is absolutely perfect — but if you can’t handle the heat, definitely do not make this recipe. I thought it was pleasantly spicy, but others who tried it found it way too spicy to enjoy.

If You Make Guy Fieri’s Chili …

1. Scale back on the cayenne and jalapeños if heat isn’t your thing: Feel free to reduce the amount of cayenne and jalapeños you throw in to tone down the heat a bit.

2. Roast your peppers the day before to get a head start: Roasting and peeling the peppers was one of the most time-consuming parts about making this chili. (And Guy doesn’t even tell you how to do it!) They need time to steam so their skins peel off, and I was tempted to rush so I could actually start cooking the chili. To make things easier, roast them the day before so you can hit the ground running when you make this chili.

3. When caramelizing the vegetables, ditch Guy’s recommended cook time: He instructs you to caramelize the vegetable mixture for five minutes, but this isn’t nearly enough time to actually develop any color. It took me about 20 minutes to fully caramelize the veggies, so go by sight rather than time.

4. Feel free to ditch the homemade fries: Sure, the fries tasted pretty great with the chili, but they’re not a make-or-break component. The were kind of a pain to make (and take 24 hours of soaking time before you can even start to cook them), so feel free to use frozen or store-bought fries or simply omit them.


Guy Fieri’s Spicy Chili Recipe Packs a Serious Punch

Regardless of whether or not you want to visit Flavortown, just about everyone knows who Guy Fieri is. But what you might not know is that beyond the frosted tips and bowling shirts, Fieri is a pretty serious cook, too. Along with showing the nation some of the best under-the-radar restaurants on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, Fieri has authored multiple best-selling cookbooks, owned restaurants, and cooked alongside some of the best chefs in the business. In short? His fiery persona is not just for show.

So when hunting for a chili recipe that wouldn’t hold back, I knew Fieri would deliver. I figured his all-or-nothing approach to cooking would be perfect for chili, and who better to amp up the spice than the mayor of Flavortown himself? His recipe — dubbed dragon’s breath chili — uses a slew of zesty ingredients from roasted peppers to spicy Italian sausage, so I knew it would pack a punch.

How to Make Guy Fieri’s “Dragon’s Breath Chili”

Guy starts by cooking diced Anaheim and poblano chilis along with jalapeños, bell peppers, and onions until caramelized. To that, he adds garlic and cubes of chuck roast.

Once browned, Guy adds even more meat (ground beef and bulk Italian sausage) and a slew of spices — including chili powder, cayenne, coriander, and cumin — and cooks them until fragrant. Then he adds tomato sauce, tomato paste, beer, stock, and two types of beans (whew) and lets everything simmer for two hours.

Here’s where the true Fieri-ness kicks in. While the chili is simmering, Fieri makes a batch of homemade french fries to serve with the chili. (Because really, what better garnish is there?) His process is pretty typical and involves soaking the potatoes, par-cooking them, and finishing them in hot oil. He serves the chili with the fries and garnishes everything with crackers, green onions, and shredded cheese.

What I Thought of the Results

When Guy named his chili “dragon’s breath,” he wasn’t kidding. This chili is seriously hot and not for the faint of heart. The heat creeps up on you as you eat, and slowly hits you in the back of the throat. Between the jalapeños and the cayenne, this chili is very spicy.

But it’s not heat without flavor — and Guy’s chili is actually very tasty. It has a generous amount of seasoning and doesn’t skimp on flavor. While other chili recipes are pretty mild (I’m looking at you, Ina), Guy’s is the complete opposite. It’s intense, fiery, and doesn’t hold back — just like Fieri himself. The generous amount of garlic, onions, and roasted peppers adds a depth of flavor that makes it taste almost like a mole sauce, and the complexity made me want to keep eating.

So if you love spicy foods, this chili is absolutely perfect — but if you can’t handle the heat, definitely do not make this recipe. I thought it was pleasantly spicy, but others who tried it found it way too spicy to enjoy.

If You Make Guy Fieri’s Chili …

1. Scale back on the cayenne and jalapeños if heat isn’t your thing: Feel free to reduce the amount of cayenne and jalapeños you throw in to tone down the heat a bit.

2. Roast your peppers the day before to get a head start: Roasting and peeling the peppers was one of the most time-consuming parts about making this chili. (And Guy doesn’t even tell you how to do it!) They need time to steam so their skins peel off, and I was tempted to rush so I could actually start cooking the chili. To make things easier, roast them the day before so you can hit the ground running when you make this chili.

3. When caramelizing the vegetables, ditch Guy’s recommended cook time: He instructs you to caramelize the vegetable mixture for five minutes, but this isn’t nearly enough time to actually develop any color. It took me about 20 minutes to fully caramelize the veggies, so go by sight rather than time.

4. Feel free to ditch the homemade fries: Sure, the fries tasted pretty great with the chili, but they’re not a make-or-break component. The were kind of a pain to make (and take 24 hours of soaking time before you can even start to cook them), so feel free to use frozen or store-bought fries or simply omit them.


Guy Fieri’s Spicy Chili Recipe Packs a Serious Punch

Regardless of whether or not you want to visit Flavortown, just about everyone knows who Guy Fieri is. But what you might not know is that beyond the frosted tips and bowling shirts, Fieri is a pretty serious cook, too. Along with showing the nation some of the best under-the-radar restaurants on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, Fieri has authored multiple best-selling cookbooks, owned restaurants, and cooked alongside some of the best chefs in the business. In short? His fiery persona is not just for show.

So when hunting for a chili recipe that wouldn’t hold back, I knew Fieri would deliver. I figured his all-or-nothing approach to cooking would be perfect for chili, and who better to amp up the spice than the mayor of Flavortown himself? His recipe — dubbed dragon’s breath chili — uses a slew of zesty ingredients from roasted peppers to spicy Italian sausage, so I knew it would pack a punch.

How to Make Guy Fieri’s “Dragon’s Breath Chili”

Guy starts by cooking diced Anaheim and poblano chilis along with jalapeños, bell peppers, and onions until caramelized. To that, he adds garlic and cubes of chuck roast.

Once browned, Guy adds even more meat (ground beef and bulk Italian sausage) and a slew of spices — including chili powder, cayenne, coriander, and cumin — and cooks them until fragrant. Then he adds tomato sauce, tomato paste, beer, stock, and two types of beans (whew) and lets everything simmer for two hours.

Here’s where the true Fieri-ness kicks in. While the chili is simmering, Fieri makes a batch of homemade french fries to serve with the chili. (Because really, what better garnish is there?) His process is pretty typical and involves soaking the potatoes, par-cooking them, and finishing them in hot oil. He serves the chili with the fries and garnishes everything with crackers, green onions, and shredded cheese.

What I Thought of the Results

When Guy named his chili “dragon’s breath,” he wasn’t kidding. This chili is seriously hot and not for the faint of heart. The heat creeps up on you as you eat, and slowly hits you in the back of the throat. Between the jalapeños and the cayenne, this chili is very spicy.

But it’s not heat without flavor — and Guy’s chili is actually very tasty. It has a generous amount of seasoning and doesn’t skimp on flavor. While other chili recipes are pretty mild (I’m looking at you, Ina), Guy’s is the complete opposite. It’s intense, fiery, and doesn’t hold back — just like Fieri himself. The generous amount of garlic, onions, and roasted peppers adds a depth of flavor that makes it taste almost like a mole sauce, and the complexity made me want to keep eating.

So if you love spicy foods, this chili is absolutely perfect — but if you can’t handle the heat, definitely do not make this recipe. I thought it was pleasantly spicy, but others who tried it found it way too spicy to enjoy.

If You Make Guy Fieri’s Chili …

1. Scale back on the cayenne and jalapeños if heat isn’t your thing: Feel free to reduce the amount of cayenne and jalapeños you throw in to tone down the heat a bit.

2. Roast your peppers the day before to get a head start: Roasting and peeling the peppers was one of the most time-consuming parts about making this chili. (And Guy doesn’t even tell you how to do it!) They need time to steam so their skins peel off, and I was tempted to rush so I could actually start cooking the chili. To make things easier, roast them the day before so you can hit the ground running when you make this chili.

3. When caramelizing the vegetables, ditch Guy’s recommended cook time: He instructs you to caramelize the vegetable mixture for five minutes, but this isn’t nearly enough time to actually develop any color. It took me about 20 minutes to fully caramelize the veggies, so go by sight rather than time.

4. Feel free to ditch the homemade fries: Sure, the fries tasted pretty great with the chili, but they’re not a make-or-break component. The were kind of a pain to make (and take 24 hours of soaking time before you can even start to cook them), so feel free to use frozen or store-bought fries or simply omit them.


Guy Fieri’s Spicy Chili Recipe Packs a Serious Punch

Regardless of whether or not you want to visit Flavortown, just about everyone knows who Guy Fieri is. But what you might not know is that beyond the frosted tips and bowling shirts, Fieri is a pretty serious cook, too. Along with showing the nation some of the best under-the-radar restaurants on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, Fieri has authored multiple best-selling cookbooks, owned restaurants, and cooked alongside some of the best chefs in the business. In short? His fiery persona is not just for show.

So when hunting for a chili recipe that wouldn’t hold back, I knew Fieri would deliver. I figured his all-or-nothing approach to cooking would be perfect for chili, and who better to amp up the spice than the mayor of Flavortown himself? His recipe — dubbed dragon’s breath chili — uses a slew of zesty ingredients from roasted peppers to spicy Italian sausage, so I knew it would pack a punch.

How to Make Guy Fieri’s “Dragon’s Breath Chili”

Guy starts by cooking diced Anaheim and poblano chilis along with jalapeños, bell peppers, and onions until caramelized. To that, he adds garlic and cubes of chuck roast.

Once browned, Guy adds even more meat (ground beef and bulk Italian sausage) and a slew of spices — including chili powder, cayenne, coriander, and cumin — and cooks them until fragrant. Then he adds tomato sauce, tomato paste, beer, stock, and two types of beans (whew) and lets everything simmer for two hours.

Here’s where the true Fieri-ness kicks in. While the chili is simmering, Fieri makes a batch of homemade french fries to serve with the chili. (Because really, what better garnish is there?) His process is pretty typical and involves soaking the potatoes, par-cooking them, and finishing them in hot oil. He serves the chili with the fries and garnishes everything with crackers, green onions, and shredded cheese.

What I Thought of the Results

When Guy named his chili “dragon’s breath,” he wasn’t kidding. This chili is seriously hot and not for the faint of heart. The heat creeps up on you as you eat, and slowly hits you in the back of the throat. Between the jalapeños and the cayenne, this chili is very spicy.

But it’s not heat without flavor — and Guy’s chili is actually very tasty. It has a generous amount of seasoning and doesn’t skimp on flavor. While other chili recipes are pretty mild (I’m looking at you, Ina), Guy’s is the complete opposite. It’s intense, fiery, and doesn’t hold back — just like Fieri himself. The generous amount of garlic, onions, and roasted peppers adds a depth of flavor that makes it taste almost like a mole sauce, and the complexity made me want to keep eating.

So if you love spicy foods, this chili is absolutely perfect — but if you can’t handle the heat, definitely do not make this recipe. I thought it was pleasantly spicy, but others who tried it found it way too spicy to enjoy.

If You Make Guy Fieri’s Chili …

1. Scale back on the cayenne and jalapeños if heat isn’t your thing: Feel free to reduce the amount of cayenne and jalapeños you throw in to tone down the heat a bit.

2. Roast your peppers the day before to get a head start: Roasting and peeling the peppers was one of the most time-consuming parts about making this chili. (And Guy doesn’t even tell you how to do it!) They need time to steam so their skins peel off, and I was tempted to rush so I could actually start cooking the chili. To make things easier, roast them the day before so you can hit the ground running when you make this chili.

3. When caramelizing the vegetables, ditch Guy’s recommended cook time: He instructs you to caramelize the vegetable mixture for five minutes, but this isn’t nearly enough time to actually develop any color. It took me about 20 minutes to fully caramelize the veggies, so go by sight rather than time.

4. Feel free to ditch the homemade fries: Sure, the fries tasted pretty great with the chili, but they’re not a make-or-break component. The were kind of a pain to make (and take 24 hours of soaking time before you can even start to cook them), so feel free to use frozen or store-bought fries or simply omit them.


Guy Fieri’s Spicy Chili Recipe Packs a Serious Punch

Regardless of whether or not you want to visit Flavortown, just about everyone knows who Guy Fieri is. But what you might not know is that beyond the frosted tips and bowling shirts, Fieri is a pretty serious cook, too. Along with showing the nation some of the best under-the-radar restaurants on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, Fieri has authored multiple best-selling cookbooks, owned restaurants, and cooked alongside some of the best chefs in the business. In short? His fiery persona is not just for show.

So when hunting for a chili recipe that wouldn’t hold back, I knew Fieri would deliver. I figured his all-or-nothing approach to cooking would be perfect for chili, and who better to amp up the spice than the mayor of Flavortown himself? His recipe — dubbed dragon’s breath chili — uses a slew of zesty ingredients from roasted peppers to spicy Italian sausage, so I knew it would pack a punch.

How to Make Guy Fieri’s “Dragon’s Breath Chili”

Guy starts by cooking diced Anaheim and poblano chilis along with jalapeños, bell peppers, and onions until caramelized. To that, he adds garlic and cubes of chuck roast.

Once browned, Guy adds even more meat (ground beef and bulk Italian sausage) and a slew of spices — including chili powder, cayenne, coriander, and cumin — and cooks them until fragrant. Then he adds tomato sauce, tomato paste, beer, stock, and two types of beans (whew) and lets everything simmer for two hours.

Here’s where the true Fieri-ness kicks in. While the chili is simmering, Fieri makes a batch of homemade french fries to serve with the chili. (Because really, what better garnish is there?) His process is pretty typical and involves soaking the potatoes, par-cooking them, and finishing them in hot oil. He serves the chili with the fries and garnishes everything with crackers, green onions, and shredded cheese.

What I Thought of the Results

When Guy named his chili “dragon’s breath,” he wasn’t kidding. This chili is seriously hot and not for the faint of heart. The heat creeps up on you as you eat, and slowly hits you in the back of the throat. Between the jalapeños and the cayenne, this chili is very spicy.

But it’s not heat without flavor — and Guy’s chili is actually very tasty. It has a generous amount of seasoning and doesn’t skimp on flavor. While other chili recipes are pretty mild (I’m looking at you, Ina), Guy’s is the complete opposite. It’s intense, fiery, and doesn’t hold back — just like Fieri himself. The generous amount of garlic, onions, and roasted peppers adds a depth of flavor that makes it taste almost like a mole sauce, and the complexity made me want to keep eating.

So if you love spicy foods, this chili is absolutely perfect — but if you can’t handle the heat, definitely do not make this recipe. I thought it was pleasantly spicy, but others who tried it found it way too spicy to enjoy.

If You Make Guy Fieri’s Chili …

1. Scale back on the cayenne and jalapeños if heat isn’t your thing: Feel free to reduce the amount of cayenne and jalapeños you throw in to tone down the heat a bit.

2. Roast your peppers the day before to get a head start: Roasting and peeling the peppers was one of the most time-consuming parts about making this chili. (And Guy doesn’t even tell you how to do it!) They need time to steam so their skins peel off, and I was tempted to rush so I could actually start cooking the chili. To make things easier, roast them the day before so you can hit the ground running when you make this chili.

3. When caramelizing the vegetables, ditch Guy’s recommended cook time: He instructs you to caramelize the vegetable mixture for five minutes, but this isn’t nearly enough time to actually develop any color. It took me about 20 minutes to fully caramelize the veggies, so go by sight rather than time.

4. Feel free to ditch the homemade fries: Sure, the fries tasted pretty great with the chili, but they’re not a make-or-break component. The were kind of a pain to make (and take 24 hours of soaking time before you can even start to cook them), so feel free to use frozen or store-bought fries or simply omit them.


Guy Fieri’s Spicy Chili Recipe Packs a Serious Punch

Regardless of whether or not you want to visit Flavortown, just about everyone knows who Guy Fieri is. But what you might not know is that beyond the frosted tips and bowling shirts, Fieri is a pretty serious cook, too. Along with showing the nation some of the best under-the-radar restaurants on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, Fieri has authored multiple best-selling cookbooks, owned restaurants, and cooked alongside some of the best chefs in the business. In short? His fiery persona is not just for show.

So when hunting for a chili recipe that wouldn’t hold back, I knew Fieri would deliver. I figured his all-or-nothing approach to cooking would be perfect for chili, and who better to amp up the spice than the mayor of Flavortown himself? His recipe — dubbed dragon’s breath chili — uses a slew of zesty ingredients from roasted peppers to spicy Italian sausage, so I knew it would pack a punch.

How to Make Guy Fieri’s “Dragon’s Breath Chili”

Guy starts by cooking diced Anaheim and poblano chilis along with jalapeños, bell peppers, and onions until caramelized. To that, he adds garlic and cubes of chuck roast.

Once browned, Guy adds even more meat (ground beef and bulk Italian sausage) and a slew of spices — including chili powder, cayenne, coriander, and cumin — and cooks them until fragrant. Then he adds tomato sauce, tomato paste, beer, stock, and two types of beans (whew) and lets everything simmer for two hours.

Here’s where the true Fieri-ness kicks in. While the chili is simmering, Fieri makes a batch of homemade french fries to serve with the chili. (Because really, what better garnish is there?) His process is pretty typical and involves soaking the potatoes, par-cooking them, and finishing them in hot oil. He serves the chili with the fries and garnishes everything with crackers, green onions, and shredded cheese.

What I Thought of the Results

When Guy named his chili “dragon’s breath,” he wasn’t kidding. This chili is seriously hot and not for the faint of heart. The heat creeps up on you as you eat, and slowly hits you in the back of the throat. Between the jalapeños and the cayenne, this chili is very spicy.

But it’s not heat without flavor — and Guy’s chili is actually very tasty. It has a generous amount of seasoning and doesn’t skimp on flavor. While other chili recipes are pretty mild (I’m looking at you, Ina), Guy’s is the complete opposite. It’s intense, fiery, and doesn’t hold back — just like Fieri himself. The generous amount of garlic, onions, and roasted peppers adds a depth of flavor that makes it taste almost like a mole sauce, and the complexity made me want to keep eating.

So if you love spicy foods, this chili is absolutely perfect — but if you can’t handle the heat, definitely do not make this recipe. I thought it was pleasantly spicy, but others who tried it found it way too spicy to enjoy.

If You Make Guy Fieri’s Chili …

1. Scale back on the cayenne and jalapeños if heat isn’t your thing: Feel free to reduce the amount of cayenne and jalapeños you throw in to tone down the heat a bit.

2. Roast your peppers the day before to get a head start: Roasting and peeling the peppers was one of the most time-consuming parts about making this chili. (And Guy doesn’t even tell you how to do it!) They need time to steam so their skins peel off, and I was tempted to rush so I could actually start cooking the chili. To make things easier, roast them the day before so you can hit the ground running when you make this chili.

3. When caramelizing the vegetables, ditch Guy’s recommended cook time: He instructs you to caramelize the vegetable mixture for five minutes, but this isn’t nearly enough time to actually develop any color. It took me about 20 minutes to fully caramelize the veggies, so go by sight rather than time.

4. Feel free to ditch the homemade fries: Sure, the fries tasted pretty great with the chili, but they’re not a make-or-break component. The were kind of a pain to make (and take 24 hours of soaking time before you can even start to cook them), so feel free to use frozen or store-bought fries or simply omit them.


Guy Fieri’s Spicy Chili Recipe Packs a Serious Punch

Regardless of whether or not you want to visit Flavortown, just about everyone knows who Guy Fieri is. But what you might not know is that beyond the frosted tips and bowling shirts, Fieri is a pretty serious cook, too. Along with showing the nation some of the best under-the-radar restaurants on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, Fieri has authored multiple best-selling cookbooks, owned restaurants, and cooked alongside some of the best chefs in the business. In short? His fiery persona is not just for show.

So when hunting for a chili recipe that wouldn’t hold back, I knew Fieri would deliver. I figured his all-or-nothing approach to cooking would be perfect for chili, and who better to amp up the spice than the mayor of Flavortown himself? His recipe — dubbed dragon’s breath chili — uses a slew of zesty ingredients from roasted peppers to spicy Italian sausage, so I knew it would pack a punch.

How to Make Guy Fieri’s “Dragon’s Breath Chili”

Guy starts by cooking diced Anaheim and poblano chilis along with jalapeños, bell peppers, and onions until caramelized. To that, he adds garlic and cubes of chuck roast.

Once browned, Guy adds even more meat (ground beef and bulk Italian sausage) and a slew of spices — including chili powder, cayenne, coriander, and cumin — and cooks them until fragrant. Then he adds tomato sauce, tomato paste, beer, stock, and two types of beans (whew) and lets everything simmer for two hours.

Here’s where the true Fieri-ness kicks in. While the chili is simmering, Fieri makes a batch of homemade french fries to serve with the chili. (Because really, what better garnish is there?) His process is pretty typical and involves soaking the potatoes, par-cooking them, and finishing them in hot oil. He serves the chili with the fries and garnishes everything with crackers, green onions, and shredded cheese.

What I Thought of the Results

When Guy named his chili “dragon’s breath,” he wasn’t kidding. This chili is seriously hot and not for the faint of heart. The heat creeps up on you as you eat, and slowly hits you in the back of the throat. Between the jalapeños and the cayenne, this chili is very spicy.

But it’s not heat without flavor — and Guy’s chili is actually very tasty. It has a generous amount of seasoning and doesn’t skimp on flavor. While other chili recipes are pretty mild (I’m looking at you, Ina), Guy’s is the complete opposite. It’s intense, fiery, and doesn’t hold back — just like Fieri himself. The generous amount of garlic, onions, and roasted peppers adds a depth of flavor that makes it taste almost like a mole sauce, and the complexity made me want to keep eating.

So if you love spicy foods, this chili is absolutely perfect — but if you can’t handle the heat, definitely do not make this recipe. I thought it was pleasantly spicy, but others who tried it found it way too spicy to enjoy.

If You Make Guy Fieri’s Chili …

1. Scale back on the cayenne and jalapeños if heat isn’t your thing: Feel free to reduce the amount of cayenne and jalapeños you throw in to tone down the heat a bit.

2. Roast your peppers the day before to get a head start: Roasting and peeling the peppers was one of the most time-consuming parts about making this chili. (And Guy doesn’t even tell you how to do it!) They need time to steam so their skins peel off, and I was tempted to rush so I could actually start cooking the chili. To make things easier, roast them the day before so you can hit the ground running when you make this chili.

3. When caramelizing the vegetables, ditch Guy’s recommended cook time: He instructs you to caramelize the vegetable mixture for five minutes, but this isn’t nearly enough time to actually develop any color. It took me about 20 minutes to fully caramelize the veggies, so go by sight rather than time.

4. Feel free to ditch the homemade fries: Sure, the fries tasted pretty great with the chili, but they’re not a make-or-break component. The were kind of a pain to make (and take 24 hours of soaking time before you can even start to cook them), so feel free to use frozen or store-bought fries or simply omit them.


Guy Fieri’s Spicy Chili Recipe Packs a Serious Punch

Regardless of whether or not you want to visit Flavortown, just about everyone knows who Guy Fieri is. But what you might not know is that beyond the frosted tips and bowling shirts, Fieri is a pretty serious cook, too. Along with showing the nation some of the best under-the-radar restaurants on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, Fieri has authored multiple best-selling cookbooks, owned restaurants, and cooked alongside some of the best chefs in the business. In short? His fiery persona is not just for show.

So when hunting for a chili recipe that wouldn’t hold back, I knew Fieri would deliver. I figured his all-or-nothing approach to cooking would be perfect for chili, and who better to amp up the spice than the mayor of Flavortown himself? His recipe — dubbed dragon’s breath chili — uses a slew of zesty ingredients from roasted peppers to spicy Italian sausage, so I knew it would pack a punch.

How to Make Guy Fieri’s “Dragon’s Breath Chili”

Guy starts by cooking diced Anaheim and poblano chilis along with jalapeños, bell peppers, and onions until caramelized. To that, he adds garlic and cubes of chuck roast.

Once browned, Guy adds even more meat (ground beef and bulk Italian sausage) and a slew of spices — including chili powder, cayenne, coriander, and cumin — and cooks them until fragrant. Then he adds tomato sauce, tomato paste, beer, stock, and two types of beans (whew) and lets everything simmer for two hours.

Here’s where the true Fieri-ness kicks in. While the chili is simmering, Fieri makes a batch of homemade french fries to serve with the chili. (Because really, what better garnish is there?) His process is pretty typical and involves soaking the potatoes, par-cooking them, and finishing them in hot oil. He serves the chili with the fries and garnishes everything with crackers, green onions, and shredded cheese.

What I Thought of the Results

When Guy named his chili “dragon’s breath,” he wasn’t kidding. This chili is seriously hot and not for the faint of heart. The heat creeps up on you as you eat, and slowly hits you in the back of the throat. Between the jalapeños and the cayenne, this chili is very spicy.

But it’s not heat without flavor — and Guy’s chili is actually very tasty. It has a generous amount of seasoning and doesn’t skimp on flavor. While other chili recipes are pretty mild (I’m looking at you, Ina), Guy’s is the complete opposite. It’s intense, fiery, and doesn’t hold back — just like Fieri himself. The generous amount of garlic, onions, and roasted peppers adds a depth of flavor that makes it taste almost like a mole sauce, and the complexity made me want to keep eating.

So if you love spicy foods, this chili is absolutely perfect — but if you can’t handle the heat, definitely do not make this recipe. I thought it was pleasantly spicy, but others who tried it found it way too spicy to enjoy.

If You Make Guy Fieri’s Chili …

1. Scale back on the cayenne and jalapeños if heat isn’t your thing: Feel free to reduce the amount of cayenne and jalapeños you throw in to tone down the heat a bit.

2. Roast your peppers the day before to get a head start: Roasting and peeling the peppers was one of the most time-consuming parts about making this chili. (And Guy doesn’t even tell you how to do it!) They need time to steam so their skins peel off, and I was tempted to rush so I could actually start cooking the chili. To make things easier, roast them the day before so you can hit the ground running when you make this chili.

3. When caramelizing the vegetables, ditch Guy’s recommended cook time: He instructs you to caramelize the vegetable mixture for five minutes, but this isn’t nearly enough time to actually develop any color. It took me about 20 minutes to fully caramelize the veggies, so go by sight rather than time.

4. Feel free to ditch the homemade fries: Sure, the fries tasted pretty great with the chili, but they’re not a make-or-break component. The were kind of a pain to make (and take 24 hours of soaking time before you can even start to cook them), so feel free to use frozen or store-bought fries or simply omit them.


Guy Fieri’s Spicy Chili Recipe Packs a Serious Punch

Regardless of whether or not you want to visit Flavortown, just about everyone knows who Guy Fieri is. But what you might not know is that beyond the frosted tips and bowling shirts, Fieri is a pretty serious cook, too. Along with showing the nation some of the best under-the-radar restaurants on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, Fieri has authored multiple best-selling cookbooks, owned restaurants, and cooked alongside some of the best chefs in the business. In short? His fiery persona is not just for show.

So when hunting for a chili recipe that wouldn’t hold back, I knew Fieri would deliver. I figured his all-or-nothing approach to cooking would be perfect for chili, and who better to amp up the spice than the mayor of Flavortown himself? His recipe — dubbed dragon’s breath chili — uses a slew of zesty ingredients from roasted peppers to spicy Italian sausage, so I knew it would pack a punch.

How to Make Guy Fieri’s “Dragon’s Breath Chili”

Guy starts by cooking diced Anaheim and poblano chilis along with jalapeños, bell peppers, and onions until caramelized. To that, he adds garlic and cubes of chuck roast.

Once browned, Guy adds even more meat (ground beef and bulk Italian sausage) and a slew of spices — including chili powder, cayenne, coriander, and cumin — and cooks them until fragrant. Then he adds tomato sauce, tomato paste, beer, stock, and two types of beans (whew) and lets everything simmer for two hours.

Here’s where the true Fieri-ness kicks in. While the chili is simmering, Fieri makes a batch of homemade french fries to serve with the chili. (Because really, what better garnish is there?) His process is pretty typical and involves soaking the potatoes, par-cooking them, and finishing them in hot oil. He serves the chili with the fries and garnishes everything with crackers, green onions, and shredded cheese.

What I Thought of the Results

When Guy named his chili “dragon’s breath,” he wasn’t kidding. This chili is seriously hot and not for the faint of heart. The heat creeps up on you as you eat, and slowly hits you in the back of the throat. Between the jalapeños and the cayenne, this chili is very spicy.

But it’s not heat without flavor — and Guy’s chili is actually very tasty. It has a generous amount of seasoning and doesn’t skimp on flavor. While other chili recipes are pretty mild (I’m looking at you, Ina), Guy’s is the complete opposite. It’s intense, fiery, and doesn’t hold back — just like Fieri himself. The generous amount of garlic, onions, and roasted peppers adds a depth of flavor that makes it taste almost like a mole sauce, and the complexity made me want to keep eating.

So if you love spicy foods, this chili is absolutely perfect — but if you can’t handle the heat, definitely do not make this recipe. I thought it was pleasantly spicy, but others who tried it found it way too spicy to enjoy.

If You Make Guy Fieri’s Chili …

1. Scale back on the cayenne and jalapeños if heat isn’t your thing: Feel free to reduce the amount of cayenne and jalapeños you throw in to tone down the heat a bit.

2. Roast your peppers the day before to get a head start: Roasting and peeling the peppers was one of the most time-consuming parts about making this chili. (And Guy doesn’t even tell you how to do it!) They need time to steam so their skins peel off, and I was tempted to rush so I could actually start cooking the chili. To make things easier, roast them the day before so you can hit the ground running when you make this chili.

3. When caramelizing the vegetables, ditch Guy’s recommended cook time: He instructs you to caramelize the vegetable mixture for five minutes, but this isn’t nearly enough time to actually develop any color. It took me about 20 minutes to fully caramelize the veggies, so go by sight rather than time.

4. Feel free to ditch the homemade fries: Sure, the fries tasted pretty great with the chili, but they’re not a make-or-break component. The were kind of a pain to make (and take 24 hours of soaking time before you can even start to cook them), so feel free to use frozen or store-bought fries or simply omit them.


Guy Fieri’s Spicy Chili Recipe Packs a Serious Punch

Regardless of whether or not you want to visit Flavortown, just about everyone knows who Guy Fieri is. But what you might not know is that beyond the frosted tips and bowling shirts, Fieri is a pretty serious cook, too. Along with showing the nation some of the best under-the-radar restaurants on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, Fieri has authored multiple best-selling cookbooks, owned restaurants, and cooked alongside some of the best chefs in the business. In short? His fiery persona is not just for show.

So when hunting for a chili recipe that wouldn’t hold back, I knew Fieri would deliver. I figured his all-or-nothing approach to cooking would be perfect for chili, and who better to amp up the spice than the mayor of Flavortown himself? His recipe — dubbed dragon’s breath chili — uses a slew of zesty ingredients from roasted peppers to spicy Italian sausage, so I knew it would pack a punch.

How to Make Guy Fieri’s “Dragon’s Breath Chili”

Guy starts by cooking diced Anaheim and poblano chilis along with jalapeños, bell peppers, and onions until caramelized. To that, he adds garlic and cubes of chuck roast.

Once browned, Guy adds even more meat (ground beef and bulk Italian sausage) and a slew of spices — including chili powder, cayenne, coriander, and cumin — and cooks them until fragrant. Then he adds tomato sauce, tomato paste, beer, stock, and two types of beans (whew) and lets everything simmer for two hours.

Here’s where the true Fieri-ness kicks in. While the chili is simmering, Fieri makes a batch of homemade french fries to serve with the chili. (Because really, what better garnish is there?) His process is pretty typical and involves soaking the potatoes, par-cooking them, and finishing them in hot oil. He serves the chili with the fries and garnishes everything with crackers, green onions, and shredded cheese.

What I Thought of the Results

When Guy named his chili “dragon’s breath,” he wasn’t kidding. This chili is seriously hot and not for the faint of heart. The heat creeps up on you as you eat, and slowly hits you in the back of the throat. Between the jalapeños and the cayenne, this chili is very spicy.

But it’s not heat without flavor — and Guy’s chili is actually very tasty. It has a generous amount of seasoning and doesn’t skimp on flavor. While other chili recipes are pretty mild (I’m looking at you, Ina), Guy’s is the complete opposite. It’s intense, fiery, and doesn’t hold back — just like Fieri himself. The generous amount of garlic, onions, and roasted peppers adds a depth of flavor that makes it taste almost like a mole sauce, and the complexity made me want to keep eating.

So if you love spicy foods, this chili is absolutely perfect — but if you can’t handle the heat, definitely do not make this recipe. I thought it was pleasantly spicy, but others who tried it found it way too spicy to enjoy.

If You Make Guy Fieri’s Chili …

1. Scale back on the cayenne and jalapeños if heat isn’t your thing: Feel free to reduce the amount of cayenne and jalapeños you throw in to tone down the heat a bit.

2. Roast your peppers the day before to get a head start: Roasting and peeling the peppers was one of the most time-consuming parts about making this chili. (And Guy doesn’t even tell you how to do it!) They need time to steam so their skins peel off, and I was tempted to rush so I could actually start cooking the chili. To make things easier, roast them the day before so you can hit the ground running when you make this chili.

3. When caramelizing the vegetables, ditch Guy’s recommended cook time: He instructs you to caramelize the vegetable mixture for five minutes, but this isn’t nearly enough time to actually develop any color. It took me about 20 minutes to fully caramelize the veggies, so go by sight rather than time.

4. Feel free to ditch the homemade fries: Sure, the fries tasted pretty great with the chili, but they’re not a make-or-break component. The were kind of a pain to make (and take 24 hours of soaking time before you can even start to cook them), so feel free to use frozen or store-bought fries or simply omit them.


Watch the video: Guy Fieri: Heres what you can do to help your favorite restaurant recover (May 2022).